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20121129
20121207
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, secretary of state talked about increased concerns over assad's action. given the increased concern, has the president, the secretary of state started to more seriously considering arming the rebels, no-fly zone, any other alternatives? >> our position on that issue has not changed. we think it is important for all scenarios. it is important to know they are on the issue, but we continue to believe that political resolution is the best resolution in syria. >> any indication that assad got the president's message yesterday and took it to heart? [inaudible] >> obviously, have not had a direct conversation -- >> right -- >> it would be hard to imagine they are not fully aware of the seriousness of the president's position on this, the seriousness with which we would take the prospect of the use of chemical weapons and, you know, i think that message was delivered clearly by the president, by others in the administration, and others around the world. we continue to say that if the assad regime makes the mistake of using chemical weapons or fails to meet obligations to secure chemical weapons
this conflict, syrian president bashar al-assad has blamed the high civiliadeaths on the rebels themselves, foreign agents and military accidents. >> ( translated ): we do not carry out these acts because we love to spill blood. this battle was forced upon us, and the result is this blood that has been spilled. >> warner: malinowski of human rights watch says the rebels do have abuses to account for, too. >> the overwhelming majority of human rights abuses in this conflict have been committed by the syrian government and its militia allies. that doesn't mean that the rebels have been perfect. >> warner: just today, video surfaced of f.s.a. fces allegedly executing unarmed syrian soldiers, though the veracity of the video could not be verified. still, when it comes to killing civilians, independent observers hold the regime primarily responsible. in late may, more than 100 men, women and children were butchered in the village of houla. a united nations-appointed panel said government forces and loyalist militias were responsible for the massacre. then too, president assad denied his regime'
some time the bashar al-assad regime turned out the mobile phone communications and the internet. the bashar al-assad said no it was in factor reuss that turned it off and they are working to restore it. either way there does seem to be something happening in the bashar al-assad regime and we are not sure exactly what it actually is. rebels appear to be moving closer and closer to damascus, martha. martha: we'll watch it. conor powell in jerusalem, thank you very much. bill: back here at home now the immigration battle is heating up in the state of arizona. immigration rights advocates suing the governor jan brewer for denying driver's licenses to those who are haoeur here illegally but qualify for a presidential order that allow them to stay in the u.s. >> your folks have been granted the right to live and work here. they cannot drive to school or work, as a policy matter it makes so sense, it's counterproductive. bill: the person at the center of this is with me now, arizona governor jan briar. good mornin brewer. welcome to "america's newsroom." >> it's good to be with you. bi
of the assad regime. they vetoed three u.n. security resolutions aimed at imposing tough sanctions on the assad regime. when russia isn't using their veto power, they're arming the assad dictatorship with over $1 billion in weaponry including attack helicopters they are using to continue terror against their citizens in syria. let me be clear. while i fully oppose russia's actions in syria, this bill is no gift to russia. in fact, this bill has teeth. it brings russia into a rules-based system. it's good for america, good for our economy and our jobs. and i think it strikes a critical balance by giving critical assistance to american companies that want to export their products to russia's growing middle class, supporting good-paying jobs here at home. however, forcing russia to play by the rules and, again, providing binding penalties if they fail to livep
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)